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Creating a Frictionless SignUp Experience with Auth0 for your Application

Riyaz Ahmed

Full-stack Development

What is Auth0 and frictionless signup?

Auth0 is a service that handles your application’s authentication and authorization needs with simple drop-in solutions. It can save time and risk compared to building your own authentication/authorization system. Auth0 even has its own universal login/signup page that can be customized through the dashboard, and it also provides APIs to create/manage users.

A frictionless signup flow allows the user to use a core feature of the application without forcing the user to sign up first. Many companies use this flow, namely Bookmyshow, Redbus, Makemytrip, and Goibibo. 

So, as an example, we will see how an application like Bookmyshow looks with this frictionless flow. First, let’s assume the user is a first-time user for this application; the user lands on the landing page, selects a movie, selects the theater, selects the number of seats, and then lands on the payment page where they will fill in their contact details (email and mobile number) and proceed to complete the booking flow by paying for the ticket. At this point, the user has accessed the website and made a booking without even signing up.

Later on, when the user sign ups using the same contact details which were provided during booking, they will notice their previous bookings and other details waiting for them on the app’s account page.

What we will be doing in this blog?

In this blog, we will be implementing Auth0 and replicating a similar feature as mentioned above using Auth0. In this code sample, we will be using react.js for the frontend and nest.js for the backend. 

To keep the blog short, we will only focus on the logic related to the frictionless signup with Auth0. We will not be going through other aspects, like payment service/integration, nest.js, ORM, etc.

Setup for the Auth0 dashboard:

Auth0’s documentation is pretty straightforward and easy to understand; we’ll link the sections for this setup, and you can easily sign up and continue your setup with the help of their documentation.

Do note that you will have to create two applications for this flow. One is a Single-Page Application for your frontend so that you can initiate login from your frontend app and the other is ManagementV2 for your server so that you can use their management APIs to create a user.

After registering you will get the client id and client secret on the application details page, you will require these keys to plug it in auth0’s SDK so you will be able to use its APIs in your application.

Setup for your single-page application:

To use Auth0’s API, we would have to install its SDK. For single-page applications, Auth0 has rewritten a new SDK from auth0-js called auth0-spa-js. But if you are using either Angular, React, or Vue, then auth0 already has created their framework/library-specific wrapper for us to use.

So, we will move on to installing its React wrapper and continuing with the setup:

npm install @auth0/auth0-react

Then, we will wrap our app with Auth0Provider and provide the keys from the Auth0 application settings dashboard:

CODE: https://gist.github.com/velotiotech/fef4d525a2c601e3d07e84561970cecf.js

You will find the explanation of the above props and more on Auth0’s React APIs through their GitHub link https://github.com/auth0/auth0-react.

But we do want to cover one issue with their authenticated state and redirection. We noticed that when Auth0 redirects to our application, the isAuthenticated flag doesn’t get reflected immediately. The states get sequentially updated like so:

  • isLoading: false
    isAuthenticated: false

  • isLoading: true
    isAuthenticated: false

  • isLoading: false
    isAuthenticated: false

  • isLoading: false
    isAuthenticated: true

This can be a pain if you have some common redirection logic based on the user‘s authentication state and user type. 

What we found out from the Auth0’s community forum is that Auth0 does take some time to parse and update its states, and after the update operations, it then calls the onRedirectCallback function, so it’s safe to put your redirection logic in onRedirectCallback, but there is another issue with that. 

The function doesn’t have access to Auth0’s context, so you can’t access the user object or any other state for your redirection logic, so you would want to redirect to a page where you have your redirection logic when onRedirectCallback is called.

So, in place of the actual page set in redirectUri, you would want to use a buffer page like the /auth-callback route where it just shows a progress bar and nothing else.

Implementation:

For login/signup, since we are using the universal page we don’t have to do much, we just have to initiate the login with loginWithRedirect() function from the UI, and Auth0 will handle the rest.

Now, for the core part of the blog, we will now be creating a createBooking API on our nest.js backend, which will accept email, mobile number, booking details (movie, theater location, number of seats), and try to create a booking.

In this frictionless flow, internally the application does create a user for the booking to refer to; otherwise, it would be difficult to show the bookings once the user signups and tries to access its bookings. 

So, the logic would go as follows: first, it will check if a user exists with the provided email in our DB. If not, then we will create the user in Auth0 through its management API with a temporary password, and then we will link the newly created Auth0 user in our users table. Then, by using this, we will create a booking.

Here is an overview of how the createBooking API will look:

CODE: https://gist.github.com/velotiotech/52d27e483d4a1d02c2582be59ab1c04b.js

As for creating the user on Auth0, we will use Auth0’s management API with the /dbconnections/signup endpoint.
Apart from the config details that the API requires (client_id, client_secret and connection), it also requires email and password. For the password, we will use a randomly generated one.

After the user has been created, we will send a forgotten password email to that email address so that the user can set the password and access the account.

Do note you will have to use the client_id, client_secret, and connection of the ManagementV2 application that was created in the Auth0 dashboard.

CODE: https://gist.github.com/velotiotech/d5c540a7b7c10cfe7c02aeb790a32d34.js

To send the forgotten password email, we will use the /dbconnections/change_password endpoint from the management API. The code is pretty straightforward.

This way, the user can change the password, and he/she will be able to access their account.

CODE: https://gist.github.com/velotiotech/2a39a98fe488ad29c1e77f610a7f0aff.js

With this, the user can now make a booking without signing up and have a user created in Auth0 for that user, so when he/she logs in later using the universal login page, Auth0 will have a reference for it.

Conclusion:

Auth0 is a great platform for managing your application’s authentication and authorization needs if you have a simple enough login/signup flow. It can get a bit tricky when you are trying to implement a non-traditional login/signup flow or a custom flow, which is not supported by Auth0. In such a scenario, you would need to add some custom code as explained in the example above. 

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Creating a Frictionless SignUp Experience with Auth0 for your Application

What is Auth0 and frictionless signup?

Auth0 is a service that handles your application’s authentication and authorization needs with simple drop-in solutions. It can save time and risk compared to building your own authentication/authorization system. Auth0 even has its own universal login/signup page that can be customized through the dashboard, and it also provides APIs to create/manage users.

A frictionless signup flow allows the user to use a core feature of the application without forcing the user to sign up first. Many companies use this flow, namely Bookmyshow, Redbus, Makemytrip, and Goibibo. 

So, as an example, we will see how an application like Bookmyshow looks with this frictionless flow. First, let’s assume the user is a first-time user for this application; the user lands on the landing page, selects a movie, selects the theater, selects the number of seats, and then lands on the payment page where they will fill in their contact details (email and mobile number) and proceed to complete the booking flow by paying for the ticket. At this point, the user has accessed the website and made a booking without even signing up.

Later on, when the user sign ups using the same contact details which were provided during booking, they will notice their previous bookings and other details waiting for them on the app’s account page.

What we will be doing in this blog?

In this blog, we will be implementing Auth0 and replicating a similar feature as mentioned above using Auth0. In this code sample, we will be using react.js for the frontend and nest.js for the backend. 

To keep the blog short, we will only focus on the logic related to the frictionless signup with Auth0. We will not be going through other aspects, like payment service/integration, nest.js, ORM, etc.

Setup for the Auth0 dashboard:

Auth0’s documentation is pretty straightforward and easy to understand; we’ll link the sections for this setup, and you can easily sign up and continue your setup with the help of their documentation.

Do note that you will have to create two applications for this flow. One is a Single-Page Application for your frontend so that you can initiate login from your frontend app and the other is ManagementV2 for your server so that you can use their management APIs to create a user.

After registering you will get the client id and client secret on the application details page, you will require these keys to plug it in auth0’s SDK so you will be able to use its APIs in your application.

Setup for your single-page application:

To use Auth0’s API, we would have to install its SDK. For single-page applications, Auth0 has rewritten a new SDK from auth0-js called auth0-spa-js. But if you are using either Angular, React, or Vue, then auth0 already has created their framework/library-specific wrapper for us to use.

So, we will move on to installing its React wrapper and continuing with the setup:

npm install @auth0/auth0-react

Then, we will wrap our app with Auth0Provider and provide the keys from the Auth0 application settings dashboard:

CODE: https://gist.github.com/velotiotech/fef4d525a2c601e3d07e84561970cecf.js

You will find the explanation of the above props and more on Auth0’s React APIs through their GitHub link https://github.com/auth0/auth0-react.

But we do want to cover one issue with their authenticated state and redirection. We noticed that when Auth0 redirects to our application, the isAuthenticated flag doesn’t get reflected immediately. The states get sequentially updated like so:

  • isLoading: false
    isAuthenticated: false

  • isLoading: true
    isAuthenticated: false

  • isLoading: false
    isAuthenticated: false

  • isLoading: false
    isAuthenticated: true

This can be a pain if you have some common redirection logic based on the user‘s authentication state and user type. 

What we found out from the Auth0’s community forum is that Auth0 does take some time to parse and update its states, and after the update operations, it then calls the onRedirectCallback function, so it’s safe to put your redirection logic in onRedirectCallback, but there is another issue with that. 

The function doesn’t have access to Auth0’s context, so you can’t access the user object or any other state for your redirection logic, so you would want to redirect to a page where you have your redirection logic when onRedirectCallback is called.

So, in place of the actual page set in redirectUri, you would want to use a buffer page like the /auth-callback route where it just shows a progress bar and nothing else.

Implementation:

For login/signup, since we are using the universal page we don’t have to do much, we just have to initiate the login with loginWithRedirect() function from the UI, and Auth0 will handle the rest.

Now, for the core part of the blog, we will now be creating a createBooking API on our nest.js backend, which will accept email, mobile number, booking details (movie, theater location, number of seats), and try to create a booking.

In this frictionless flow, internally the application does create a user for the booking to refer to; otherwise, it would be difficult to show the bookings once the user signups and tries to access its bookings. 

So, the logic would go as follows: first, it will check if a user exists with the provided email in our DB. If not, then we will create the user in Auth0 through its management API with a temporary password, and then we will link the newly created Auth0 user in our users table. Then, by using this, we will create a booking.

Here is an overview of how the createBooking API will look:

CODE: https://gist.github.com/velotiotech/52d27e483d4a1d02c2582be59ab1c04b.js

As for creating the user on Auth0, we will use Auth0’s management API with the /dbconnections/signup endpoint.
Apart from the config details that the API requires (client_id, client_secret and connection), it also requires email and password. For the password, we will use a randomly generated one.

After the user has been created, we will send a forgotten password email to that email address so that the user can set the password and access the account.

Do note you will have to use the client_id, client_secret, and connection of the ManagementV2 application that was created in the Auth0 dashboard.

CODE: https://gist.github.com/velotiotech/d5c540a7b7c10cfe7c02aeb790a32d34.js

To send the forgotten password email, we will use the /dbconnections/change_password endpoint from the management API. The code is pretty straightforward.

This way, the user can change the password, and he/she will be able to access their account.

CODE: https://gist.github.com/velotiotech/2a39a98fe488ad29c1e77f610a7f0aff.js

With this, the user can now make a booking without signing up and have a user created in Auth0 for that user, so when he/she logs in later using the universal login page, Auth0 will have a reference for it.

Conclusion:

Auth0 is a great platform for managing your application’s authentication and authorization needs if you have a simple enough login/signup flow. It can get a bit tricky when you are trying to implement a non-traditional login/signup flow or a custom flow, which is not supported by Auth0. In such a scenario, you would need to add some custom code as explained in the example above. 

Did you like the blog? If yes, we're sure you'll also like to work with the people who write them - our best-in-class engineering team.

We're looking for talented developers who are passionate about new emerging technologies. If that's you, get in touch with us.

Explore current openings